Feature

10 New Chicken Dishes to Try in NYC

By Kelly Dobkin  |  August 25, 2015

Chicken =  so hot right now. From Carla Hall's upcoming Nashville hot-chicken joint to the emergence of several rotisserie and fried chicken concepts in the last few months, the barnyard bird is the protein of the moment. Here are 10 dishes to try around town.

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  • Credit: Clay Williams

    Roasted chicken at Jams

    Jonathan Waxman is famed for his chicken at Barbuto, but at his brand-new reincarnated '80s classic, Jams, he's doing an old-new take on a roasted bird by cooking it in a Spanish charcoal oven and serving it with with tarragon butter and Jams potatoes. See our recent First Look here.

    1414 Avenue of the Americas; 212-703-2007

  • Roasted chicken at Broken Spoke Rotisserie

    Chef Ed Carew's recently opened Murray Hill rotisserie puts a Latin spin on traditional roast chicken. He uses 3-lb Amish chickens that can be ordered up and served whole ($22) or by the half ($13.50). Each bird is served with pickled seasonal vegetables, local corn tortillas and a bright and savory chimichurri sauce. 

    39 Third Ave.; 212-889-6298

  • Fried chicken with spicy soy vinaigrette at Oiji

    At this trendy Korean East Village eatery from chefs Brian Kim and TK Ku, the duo uses a tapioca batter to fry up this unique chicken dish until it's super light and crispy. The strips of chicken are served on a bed of lettuce with jalapeño and topped with scallions and radish in a soy vinaigrette.

    119 First Ave.; 646-767-9050

  • Coq au vin at Oleanders

    This new throwback eatery at the McCarren Hotel + Pool from the Fette Sau and St. Anselm owners travels back in time with this take on the French classic. The red wine–marinated bird is roasted and garnished with pearl onions and bacon lardons in traditional fashion.

    160 N. 12th St.; 718-218-7500

  • Credit: Kelly Dobkin

    Chicken at Streetbird Rotisserie

    Bird's the word at Marcus Samuelsson's new Harlem chicken joint: spiced, rotisserie-roasted chickens are the main event, served up in quarter, half and whole cuts both for eat-in and takeout, with an array of seriously addictive sauces for dipping including sweet soy, barbecue, jerk, hot sauce and more. There's even a Chinese chicken and a fried chicken sandwich.

    2149 Frederick Douglass Blvd.; 212-206-2557

  • Frango piri piri at Lupulo

    At Georges Mendes' new beer- and cider-focused Portuguese restaurant in Chelsea, he does a take on piri piri chicken. He starts with an organic chicken that is marinated in white wine and smoked paprika and then chars it over a wood-burning grill. Choose from a whole or half bird and the whole thing is accompanied by a side of thin french fries and piri piri hot sauce.

    835 Sixth Ave.; 212-290-7600

  • Credit: Fuku

    Fuku

    ​David Chang's line-inducing fried chicken sandwich joint, which recently expanded its dinner hours, marinates its honking chicken thighs in habanero before deep-frying to perfection and serving atop a Martin's potato roll with Fuku butter (made with pickle brine) and pickles. There's even an off-menu Koreano version with pickled daikon ribbons.

    163 First Ave.

  • ChickenShack at Shake Shack Brooklyn

    Danny Meyer's burger chainlet hopped on the bird wagon just this summer at its Brooklyn locations (see our smackdown with Fuku here) by offering the ChickenShack — a fried chicken sandwich served on a buttered Martin's potato roll with lettuce, pickles and buttermilk-herb mayo.

    409 Fulton St., Brooklyn 

    1 Old Fulton St., Brooklyn

    170 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn

  • Roasted half chicken at Houseman

    Hudson Square's hottest new American eatery, from former Prune chef Ned Baldwin and chef Adam Baumgart, does a roasted half chicken served with a bright parsley salad.

    508 Greenwich St.; 212-641-0654

  • Poulet rôti at Vaucluse (opening Sep. 2)

    Altamarea Group's first-ever French eatery, opening on the UES in early September, will serve this succulent herb-roasted chicken breast with tomato farcie and thyme jus.

    100 E. 63rd St.