Feature

San Diego’s 8 Most Extreme Dishes

By Darlene Horn  |  January 20, 2015
Credit: Darlene Horn

If extreme dining is your thing, these dishes endeavor to impress as well as satisfy your appetite. Read below for the spiciest dish in the city, a donut large enough to feed a small army and sushi so fresh, it's still moving.

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Super-Fresh Sushi at Blue Smoke Sushi Lounge

It’s a given that the fresher the sushi, the better, but how about sushi that’s still moving when served to you? Don’t let the lights and elegant display of their deluxe sashimi basket of tuna, yellowtail, salmon, scallops, octopus and sea urchin distract that the shrimp is still wriggling. Only for the brave of heart, this stunning piece is a conversation starter waiting to be eaten.

Texas Donut at Peterson’s Donut Corner

Everything is big in Texas, but you’ll find the donut equivalent in Escondido. Ranging from three pounds to a whopping 10, a day is required for these special-order pastries. Meant to replace special-occasion cakes, these donuts can be crafted into almost any shape, including letters.

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Scorpion Wings at Regents Pizzeria

Ranked among the top five hottest peppers at 2,000,000 Scoville units, a signed waiver releasing the restaurant from any injuries is required before digging into these super-spicy wings — the hottest thing on their menu. And consuming the wings is only part of the problem. Beware of lingering hot-pepper residue on fingers, which will destroy your eyes if they're accidentally touched. So when the tears come pouring out, don't say we didn’t warn you.

2-in-1 Burrito at Lolita’s Taco Shop

Choosing between a burrito or rolled tacos shouldn’t be a problem when one is rolled into the other. According a previously published article, this popular San Diego chain seems to be the originator of this SoCal delicacy. Aside from the two rolled tacos stuffed into a flour tortilla, a good helping of carne asada, guacamole and three cheeses leave room for nothing else.

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Millionaire’s Milkshake at Shakeaway

A penny shy of $20 for a milkshake seems pretty steep for a vanilla shake, but when you consider the high-priced ingredients, it kind of makes sense to try, if only for bragging rights. Vanilla ice cream mixed with Bourneville dark chocolate bars imported from the UK and a cup of roasted hazelnuts make for an already impressive shake, but add a final flourish of edible 23-karat gold flakes on top and you have yourself a mini-party complete with noisemakers.

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One-Armed Mary at Great Maple

Before octopus started making waves in eateries across the U.S., this restaurant had been featuring it in one of the unlikeliest forms: cocktails. Submerged in vodka, house mix, fresh lemon and spices, a spicy grilled octopus tentacle reaches out from the glass and promises to beat any other Bloody Mary version with several arms tied behind its back.

Suckling Pig Dinner at Alchemy

Choose from Cuban-, Southern- or Polynesian-style pig — roasted whole and served complete from snout to tail. This dinner requires at least eight very hungry people and reservations four days in advance. Served with traditional sides fitting the style of cooking, like plantain chips or pineapple fried rice, it’s an interactive dish that’s all hands and pure porcine pleasure from the first bite to the very last.

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Tracy’s Kitchen Sink Sundae at Sloan’s Ice Cream

With 12 scoops of the shop’s premium ice cream and toppings galore — we’re talking brownies, cookies, bananas, whipped cream, fudge sauce, etc. — this enormous sundae, served in a bowl resembling a kitchen sink, is enough to feed a small army. But don’t chow down too fast: brain freeze has been known to quash even the most ardent of ice cream fanatics.